JOE'S PUB at THE PUBLIC

JOE'S PUB at THE PUBLIC

Named for Public Theater founder Joe Papp, Joe’s Pub is one of New York City’s most celebrated venues for emerging and legendary artists.
Sep 19 '14

I Deserve Justice: Native Women From Alaska - 5 Part Series

This September, as world leaders make their way to the United Nations for the World Conference on Indigenous Peoples, five brave Alaska Native women are traveling to New York to ask the world to assist them in their journey for justice for women. 

This series highlights the five women featured in Sliver of a Full Moon, a new play about this journey, at Joe’s Pub at The Public on September 21.

Part 5 - Nettie Warbelow

Nettie J. Warbelow is the ICWA Coordinator for the Native Village of Tetlin an Advocate for DV/Sexual Assault.

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She was born in Alaska and was raised in the Village of Tetlin, Alaska where she was raised traditionally, with her grandmother teaching her the essentials of the Athabascan culture and language. Nettie is fluent in the Tetlin Athabascan dialect, and is a strong supporter and advocate of Culture preservation. Nettie has worked in the field of Social Services for Child protection, ICWA, Advocate for DV/Sexual Assualt, SART Trained, State Court Proceedings and Tribal Court for over 20 years. She was involved during the passage of the ICWA law for Alaska. Nettie was involved in developing the Native Village of Tetlin Written Code of Tribial Ordinances. She also is an expert with Ex parta for her clients with the Court systems. Nettie has demonstrated many task from Tetlin Tribal Council Liaison, Grantwriter, Workshop Facilitator, Tribal Court Clerk, Tetlin Corporation Secretary, State Social Service Associate to Foster Care/Adoption. Nettie Served on many boards throughout her years advocating for people. Nettie also loves working with the youth. Her passion is Community Healing through holistic culture and traditional teachings. Nettie has one daughter Sadie Rose, who is close to her heart

Background:

In 1978, the United States Supreme Court issued its decision in Oliphant v. Suquamish Indan Tribe, declaring that American Indian Nations could no longer exercise jurisdiction over non-native offenders who commit crimes on tribal lands. Although the re-authorization of the Violence Against Women Act (“VAWA”) in March 2013 restores a portion of the jurisdiction that Oliphant stripped away to American Indian Nations, VAWAspecifically excludes 228 federally recognized tribes in Alaska. Consequently, as a result of Section 910 of VAWA 2013, Alaska Native women remain the only group of Native women whose tribal governments cannot protect them. To learn more, read: www.sliverofafullmoon.org

2 notes Tags: alaska native vawa united nations world conference indigenous peoples nettie warbelow women domestic violence new york play american american indian social services culture joespub theater New York City

Sep 19 '14
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Sep 19 '14

I Deserve Justice: Native Women From Alaska - 5 Part Series

This September, as world leaders make their way to the United Nations for the World Conference on Indigenous Peoples, five brave Alaska Native women are traveling to New York to ask the world to assist them in their journey for justice for women. 

This series highlights the five women featured in Sliver of a Full Moon, a new play about this journey, at Joe’s Pub at The Public on September 21.

Part 4 - Joann Horn

Joann speaks about her work at the Emmonak Women’s Shelter in a documentary about the survival of Native women in Alaska, Daughters of Emmonak.

"First of all, I would like to share with you all that I am a survivor of domestic violence.  I have been in and out of shelter programs with my children.  After seeing what I made my children go through, I decided not to take the abuse anymore with my kids.  I felt sorry for them because they saw and heard the abuse between me and my husband.  Therefore, I decided to start working at the shelter and start working as a relief advocate to rural outreach program, and now I work as executive director of the Emmonak Woman’s Shelter (“EWS”). 

EWS has provided advocacy services since 1979, and shelter services since 1984.  In 2005, however, the State of Alaska eliminated our funding.  As a result, we struggled to remain open full time and were forced to close. 

With funding from the Office on Violence against Women, U.S.DOJ, we were able to open our Shelter again soon after. Our Shelter has 3 bedrooms, which can serve at the most 15 women and children total. Flooding earlier this year has damaged the Shelter, although we still use the Shelter, but we are looking for funding to rehabilitate or build us a new shelter. Our primary barriers to providing services to victims is funding; we need funding for heating fuel to keeping our Shelter warm in the long cold winters, electricity to keep our heating furnace operating and lights in our Shelter, and food for victims in our Shelter.  Another huge challenge is transportation.  Many of our victims live in villages where the only mode of transportation is by plane and by boat.  For instance, for a victim from the nearest village to fly to our shelter one-way, EWS must pay at least $200.  EWS cannot currently afford to pay the return trip home once the victim is safe to return to her community.  Our inability to fund travel prevents many women from seeking shelter who desperately need it.  

So for many years I have been a help to many women and children who have come to our shelter for help.  I have helped many from our area that I’ve spoken to.  Today we must stand our ground. We cannot have people from the State continue to come down and walk all over us and control us Natives.

We want respect for or future generations, for all of our native people.  This is why I’m still working for safety for women and children across the state.  Our women should be treated with respect.”

Background:

In 1978, the United States Supreme Court issued its decision in Oliphant v. Suquamish Indan Tribe, declaring that American Indian Nations could no longer exercise jurisdiction over non-native offenders who commit crimes on tribal lands. Although the re-authorization of the Violence Against Women Act (“VAWA”) in March 2013 restores a portion of the jurisdiction that Oliphant stripped away to American Indian Nations, VAWAspecifically excludes 228 federally recognized tribes in Alaska. Consequently, as a result of Section 910 of VAWA 2013, Alaska Native women remain the only group of Native women whose tribal governments cannot protect them. To learn more, read: www.sliverofafullmoon.org

11 notes Tags: vawa alaska native american native american indian supreme court world conference domestic violence women emmonak children new york sliver of a full moon mary kathryn nagle play theater

Sep 19 '14

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Sep 19 '14

flavorpill:

Wondering why people get into burlesque? Well, Sean Scheidt’s collection of burlesque portraits shows that the glamorous transformation is half the fun and a big reason why. 

View Gallery

195 notes (via flavorpill)Tags: burlesque photography

Sep 19 '14

Tags: scott thompson kids in the hall nyc joes pub trigger warning funny comedy

Sep 19 '14

I Deserve Justice: Native Women From Alaska - 5 Part Series

This September, as world leaders make their way to the United Nations for the World Conference on Indigenous Peoples, five brave Alaska Native women are traveling to New York to ask the world to assist them in their journey for justice for women. 

This series highlights the five women featured in Sliver of a Full Moon, a new play about this journey, at Joe’s Pub at The Public on September 21.

PART 3 - Tami Jerue

Tamra “Tami” Truett Jerue is a long time Alaska Native woman’s advocate and lives in the Athabascan village of Anvik, Alaska along the Yukon River. Currently, she works as the Director of Social Services for the Anvik Tribal Council. Tami has worked in various capacities on violence against Native women issues since 1977, helping to facilitate change at a community level, within systems, and families to help survivors live violence free lives.

 

Read Tamra Truett Jerue’s Statement on Why Alaska Native Women Deserve Justice

Read Chief Carl (Anvik Tribe) Jerue’s statement on why Section 910 of VAWA 2013 is devestating to Alaskan tribes and Alaskan Native women:  Anvik_FinalTestimonyJan_15_2014.

Background:

In 1978, the United States Supreme Court issued its decision in Oliphant v. Suquamish Indan Tribe, declaring that American Indian Nations could no longer exercise jurisdiction over non-native offenders who commit crimes on tribal lands. Although the re-authorization of the Violence Against Women Act (“VAWA”) in March 2013 restores a portion of the jurisdiction that Oliphant stripped away to American Indian Nations, VAWAspecifically excludes 228 federally recognized tribes in Alaska. Consequently, as a result of Section 910 of VAWA 2013, Alaska Native women remain the only group of Native women whose tribal governments cannot protect them. To learn more, read: www.sliverofafullmoon.org

7 notes Tags: native alaska vawa american indian american women new york play mary kathryn nagle sliver of a full moon anvik tamra truett jerue justice domestic violence athabascan yukon river social services

Sep 19 '14

1 note Tags: Justin Bond Queer Facebook what's in a name gender

Sep 18 '14

I Deserve Justice: Native Women From Alaska - 5 Part Series

I Deserve Justice: Native Women From Alaska - 5 Part Series

This September, as world leaders make their way to the United Nations for the World Conference on Indigenous Peoples, five brave Alaska Native women are traveling to New York to ask the world to assist them in their journey for justice for women. 

This series highlights the five women featured in Sliver of a Full Moon, a new play about this journey, at Joe’s Pub at The Public on September 21.

Part 2 - Priscilla Kameroff

I serve as the President of the Board of Directors for the Emmonak Women’s Shelter and the Yup’ik Women’s Coalition for the past several years. I have eleven years experience working in the human services field with the Native Village of Emmonak as the Indian Child Welfare Worker. This involves working closely with Office of Children’s Service when they come out to the Village to do investigations with children that may have been harmed, or were in a home that is not safe. I received a certificate in May 2010 in the Rural Human Services from KUC in Bethel, and my degree in Associate of Applied Science in Human Services in May 2012. My passion is supporting our local women’s shelter. Growing up as a young child, we have seen things such as domestic violence done to our women. It was never talked about. Everyone kept silent. The violence was swept under the rug and kept there.”

To understand why Priscilla has traveled all the way to New York seeking justice, read the AFN Resolution to Protect Alaska Native Women.

Background:

In 1978, the United States Supreme Court issued its decision in Oliphant v. Suquamish Indan Tribe, declaring that American Indian Nations could no longer exercise jurisdiction over non-native offenders who commit crimes on tribal lands. Although the re-authorization of the Violence Against Women Act (“VAWA”) in March 2013 restores a portion of the jurisdiction that Oliphant stripped away to American Indian Nations, VAWAspecifically excludes 228 federally recognized tribes in Alaska. Consequently, as a result of Section 910 of VAWA 2013, Alaska Native women remain the only group of Native women whose tribal governments cannot protect them. To learn more, read: www.sliverofafullmoon.org

31 notes Tags: alaska native VAWA united nations world conference supreme court domestic violence emmonak women yupik native village indian child welfare children rural human rights priscilla kameroff sliver of a full moon mary kathryn nagle

Sep 18 '14
pantheonbooks:

comicsalliance:

‘FUN HOME’ CREATOR ALISON BECHDEL RECEIVES MACARTHUR GENIUS GRANT
By Chris Sims
Cartoonist Alison Bechdel is virtually a household name at this point. Her comics, including Fun Home and Dykes To Watch Out For, are deservedly critically acclaimed, and ‘The Bechdel Test’ has become an increasingly relevant shorthand for analysis of gender diversity in fiction. In other words, she’s a genius, and today, that became official.
Bechdel is one of the latest recipients of The MacArthur Foundation‘s “Genius Grant,” which honors “talented individuals who have shown extraordinary originality and dedication in their creative pursuits and a marked capacity for self-direction,” and comes with an award of $625,000 that can be spent any way the recipient sees fit.
READ MORE

Many congratulations to Alison Bechdel!

pantheonbooks:

comicsalliance:

‘FUN HOME’ CREATOR ALISON BECHDEL RECEIVES MACARTHUR GENIUS GRANT

By Chris Sims

Cartoonist Alison Bechdel is virtually a household name at this point. Her comics, including Fun Home and Dykes To Watch Out For, are deservedly critically acclaimed, and ‘The Bechdel Test’ has become an increasingly relevant shorthand for analysis of gender diversity in fiction. In other words, she’s a genius, and today, that became official.

Bechdel is one of the latest recipients of The MacArthur Foundation‘s “Genius Grant,” which honors “talented individuals who have shown extraordinary originality and dedication in their creative pursuits and a marked capacity for self-direction,” and comes with an award of $625,000 that can be spent any way the recipient sees fit.

READ MORE

Many congratulations to Alison Bechdel!

873 notes (via pantheonbooks & comicsalliance)Tags: Allison bechdel art graphic novel macarthur grant